If you’re looking for a new or second-hand smartphone, then one of the main features to look out for is a great camera. So we’ve been looking for great camera phone reviews, and have made this list of essential sites you should check out.

  1. ePHOTOzine – this site has been reviewing cameras since about 2001, so their smartphone reviews mostly focus (get it?) on the camera features and performance, and as they review cameras as well, they should know what they’re talking about. They’ve also got a number of “Best” articles, so you can quickly find some of the top recommendations.
  2. GSMArena.com – dedicated to mobile phones, these guys (and gals) have in-depth smartphone reviews, plus a handy specifications feature where you can compare one camera to another. GSMArena has reviewed the S21 Ultra 5G and picked up on the images looking oversharpened.
  3. AndroidAuthority – Respect my authority! They produce detailed reviews, and the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G review looks at the performance of the multiple cameras in a lot of detail, with the 100x zoom looking better than other smartphones.
  4. The Guardian – Not your typical review site (being a newspaper), but they appear to know what they’re talking about and have reviews of the most recent smartphones.
  5. Pocket-Lint – An independent review site, they offer detailed smartphone reviews, and don’t pull any punches, in their S21 Ultra review, they find that the camera interface is confusing at times, and the 100x zoom gives abstract images.

If you’re looking to learn new photography techniques, and improve your photography skills, then there are a wide variety of photography websites out there full of photo tutorials. Here we’ve done the hard work for you, and found some of the best free photography techniques available on-line. Whether you’re looking for photography techniques, Photoshop techniques, or more general hints and tips, you’ll be able to find some great articles and advice here:

ePHOTOzine’s Top 14 Best Photography Techniques – This includes creative macro photography tips, Adobe Photoshop techniques, How to create a Vignette, Camera shooting modes explained, Photography Composition rules, Indoor photography, Food photography and more.

CreativeLive’s 7 Beginner Photography Techniques to Try – This has a range of fun and creative photography techniques you can try, including long exposure, motion blur, macro, black and white, light painting, silhouettes, and more.

PhotographyLife20 Photography Tips for Beginners – This includes a range of topics, including a number that are important to know, especially if you’re a beginner, including composition, camera settings, exposure, light, when to use a tripod, when to use a flash, and more.

Hubspot’s Phone Photography 101Take Good Pictures with your smartphone – If you’ve got a smartphone, you can still take great photos, as you’re probably aware, and Hubspot has a roundup of hints and tips to improve your phone photography.

SLRLounge10 Creative Photography Ideas and Techniques to Try – There are some more advanced techniques here, including pano stitching, using a spray bottle for creative bokeh, mixed lighting, long exposures, “free lensing”, tilt-shift and more.

Contrastly20 Amazing Photography Tips and Techniques – There are a great range of creative photography techniques here, including high-speed photography, night photography, motion blur, smoke art photography, long exposure, forced perspective, vintage, pinhole, reflection, lens flare and more.

You may have seen our page listing free photo hosting sites, and free photo hosting may be all you’re looking for, however if you’re looking for an on-line photography community you may want to look at this list. A good on-line photo community will let you leave comments, discuss photography, ask questions, get advice from other photographers, and they may even have forums where you can talk about different photography topics.

So without further ado, lets look at some of the best online photography communities out there:

  1. ePHOTOzineon-line photography community, with photo galleries, forums for discussion, free photography critique (you can get help and feedback on your own photography to help you improve), plus techniques, photo competitions, and more. There’s a paid option, that gives you more if you like it, but you can also use it for free. Based in the UK.
  2. flickr – was owned by Yahoo, and is now owned by Smugmug, but you may still need to sign in with your yahoo account (if you have one). People used to like the community here, but people now say it’s lost it’s way.
  3. 500px – recently stopped allowing people to upload and share digitally manipulated (composite) images, that would be considered “digital art” which brings us on to the next one. Lots of comments on photos.
  4. DeviantART – the clues in the name, you can share photography, digital art, and art, with a strong emphasis on digital art. Photography is also welcome.
  5. fotocommunity – free to use, on-line community, with an emphasis on creativity, sharing and discussing photos. based in Germany.
  6. Google Photos – It’s not really much of an on-line community, but more of an on-line photo backup (and sharing) system. Letting you backup an almost unlimited amount of photos (16mp max size for free). It’ll automatically back-up photos from your smartphone if you set it up. Good if you lose your phone, however, there’s no community.
  7. Facebook – Facebook is basically a huge, massive, on-line photo sharing site, however, you’re sharing your photos with all your friends and family, instead of the whole internet. Getting feedback beyond “Nice photo” and thumbs up may be difficult, however, you can search out photo communities and groups on there.
  8. ViewBug – Photo sharing site, with an emphasis on photo competitions, with a forum.
  9. Photo.net – Photos, Galleries, Forums, free to sign up.
  10. DPReview – whilst primarily a technology and camera review site, there’s a wide range of photo challenges, forums, galleries, and discussion, about all kinds of things. based in the US.

Any suggestions, or features I’ve missed, add a comment.

A new mirrorless digital camera took the flagship position in the Fujifilm X-series by bringing image-stabilization to an already incredible camera as the 4th generation Fujifilm X-T4. This mirrorless sports a 26 megapixels X-Trans CMOS 4 sensor mounted on a 5-axis image-stabilization with up to 6.5-stops efficiency.

Fujifilm refined their X-T design to improve usability of the X-T4 while also giving way to the rotating hinge favored by videographers to emphasize how capable the X-T4 is for video. It can record Cinema 4K video at 60 FPS with ultra-high quality that reaches 400Mbps.

Neocamera just published a very detailed review of the new Fujifilm X-T4, showcasing its image quality with a stunning gallery of Malta. As usual, this in-depth review covers capabilities, usability, ergonomics, image-quality and performance to help photographers decide if the Fujifilm X-T4 is right for their needs.

Among the growing lineup of Panasonic mirrorless digital camera, the compact GX9 almost got lost given that it succeeds a flagship camera without being one itself. With a similar rangefinder-style as the GX8 which introduced image-stabilization to Panasonic mirrorless, the new GX9 is a much more compact digital camera which weighs 50% less than its predecessor! As it shrunk, the GX9 lost the weatherproof build of the GX8 yet gained many more features and capabilities.

The new Panasonic GX9 fits a 20 megapixels Four-Thirds CMOS sensor without Anti-Alias Filter in one of the smallest bodies to feature an electronic viewfinder, while improving the 5-axis image-stabilization system to 4-stops of efficiency. Despite being so small, the GX9 packs a huge amount of features including a rare tilting EVF with large 0.7X magnification.

Neocamera just published a detailed review of the Panasonic GX9 which takes a good look at this camera in terms of usability, ergonomics and performance. Be sure to see the gallery of full-resolution images and comparison with the GX8 to truly appreciate the improvements brought by the GX9.

Neocamera just reviewed the hot new Nikon Z7, a new mirrorless camera from Nikon that introduces an equally new system built for top optical performance. This 46 megapixels mirrorless is designed to bring the best features and performance of professional Nikon cameras into the mirrorless world. Its sensor is based on the similarly specified one in the Nikon D850 yet with a 493-Point Phase-Detect AF system built right in. A fast EXPEED 6 processor allows the Z7 to sustain 9 FPS continuous shooting and 4K Ultra-HD video.

The Z7 is a completely new offering with redesigned body and controls that is highly efficient for the smaller form-factor. Even though it only sports a single XQD memory-card slot, the body is still fully weather-sealed and sports a class-leading 3.7 megapixels 0.5″ EVF with a large 0.8X magnification and never-seen-before sharpness.

This new Nikon Z7 just got an in-depth review published at Neocamera with full-resolution images at every standard ISO and measurements for all aspects of its performance. Read the review to find out everything about the Z7.

The compact and low-cost Fujifilm X-A5 was just reviewed at Neocamera! This entry-level gives users a new low prince-point to enter into the X-mount family of mirrorless digital cameras by Fujifilm.

The new X-A5 offers a 24 megapixels CMOS sensor with 1.5X crop-factor – just like the sensors most current entry-to-mid range DSLRs use – in a relatively compact and easy-to-use body. With dual control-dials, a traditional mode-dial and a number of external buttons, including one customizable one, the X-A5 is potentially easier to use than most entry-level mirrorless cameras on the market.

Fujifilm managed to deliver 4K Ultra-HD video, albeit at only 15 FPS, in a low price-point while incorporating a Hybrid AF system that combines Phase-Detect and Contrast-Detect in one system. There are quite a few surprising features in this small camera, including Focus-Stacking, built-in HDR, deep braketing, an Interval Timer and Time-Lapse Video modes.

Read the express review of the Fujfilm X-A5 at Neocamera to learn how this camera delivers on its premise and performs compared to its peers.

Neocamera recently published an in-depth review of the Fujifilm X-H1. This review of the latest flagship Fujifilm mirrorless digital camera analyses the capabilities, usability and performance of the X-H1, taking a complete look at every feature and ergonomic change from the X-T2 previous flagship to the latest X-H1.

The Fujifilm X-H1 is a unique camera in the Fujifilm lineup of X-mount mirrorless since it is the only one to feature a 5-axis image-stabilization system built right in. This flexible system analyzes camera movements 10,000X per second to compensate for involuntary movements of the photographer. This makes it more steady than its predecessors when shooting video which the X-H1 can in 4K Ultra-HD and Cinema 4K format.

Read the detailed Fujfilm X-H1 review here. Be sure to read the usability page that goes over what are major changes to the ergonomics and user-interface of the X-H1.

The Nikon D850 is the newest DSLR from Nikon. It takes resolution to a new level for Nikon thanks to a 46 megapixels BSI-CMOS sensor while delivering on speed with its EXPEED 5 processor that lets the D850 shoot continuously at 7 FPS or even 9 FPS when boosted by a more powerful battery fitted into the optional grip.

This Full-Frame DSLR takes the Nikon mold to a new level with a recognizable yet refined ergonomics in a sturdy weatherproof body. The D850 packs nearly every feature Nikon has built into any of its DSLRs, including 4K Ultra-HD video – now taken from the full-sensor width – Time-Lapse Video, Interval Timer, HDR, Multiple Exposure, WiFi, Bluetooth and much more. This is a completely professional DSLR suitable for any task and well-adapted to low-light with its illuminated controls, backlit status LCD and large optical viewfinder.

A detailed review of the Nikon D850 covering all its features was just published at Neocamera. This is a worthy read for anyone considering buying this high-priced DSLR or any of its competitors. Exceptionally for this review, the entire gallery of images was shot in Jamaica. Check it out!